Overview

The Raymond James Charitable Endowment Fund simplifies and increases your power of giving while it addresses your tax and financial needs. The fund simplifies the power of giving by making grants to charitable organizations on your behalf, so that you enjoy the power of giving without the hassle of timing, tax concerns, expense and recordkeeping.

Because Raymond James Charitable Endowment Fund is a tax-qualified public charity, it provides you with immediate and full tax deductions and, at the same time, seeks to increase the value of your original gift by prudent investing.

And what could be more personal? You can even name your account – for example, The Smith Family Foundation – and pass it on to your children and grandchildren so that your gift keeps on giving for generations to come.

The fund provides all the administration and reporting services needed for your giving program, including the documentation you need to calculate and support income tax deductions.

All gifts to the Raymond James Charitable Endowment Fund are irrevocable, so it’s important for you to consider your long-range needs before choosing to give. Contact your Raymond James financial advisor to receive additional information about these giving opportunities.

Investment objectives

Assets contributed to the Raymond James Charitable Endowment Fund are invested tax free. At the time of your contribution, you may recommend that your contribution be invested in any of five investment objectives:

  • Money market – Seeks the preservation of capital and the production of income exclusively through investment in a money market fund investing in the highest quality, very short-term debt instruments.
  • Income – Seeks income and the preservation of capital. Growth of capital may or may not be sought and will always be secondary.
  • Income with some growth – Seeks to emphasize income and the preservation of capital over the growth of capital. Growth will be an ever present, but secondary, consideration.
  • Balanced – Seeks to balance the production of income, preservation of capital and growth of capital.
  • Growth with some income – Seeks to emphasize the growth of capital over the production of income.
  • Growth – Seeks long-term capital appreciation. Income may or may not be sought and will always be secondary.